Climbing Up to the Next Level

 

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DawN Crandell with artist and PDP workshop leader Dread Scott

This post originally appeared on reflectionslifeartistmom, the blog of Artists Summer Institute participant DawN Crandell. Artists Summer Institute kicked off earlier this week and runs through August 9. ASI is a five-day intensive series of workshops, seminars, and presentations featuring curriculum from Creative Capital’s Professional Development Program and LMCC’s content on financials and entrepreneurship for artists.

Wow. My brain is full and my body is exhausted and there is that familiar fear and anxiety based on insecurities of not enough. I’m not enough, I’m not doing enough. I don’t have enough. But today those feelings are being pushed to the background because I am gaining the skills and deeper confidence to climb up to the next level in my career.

For the past two days I’ve been a participant in the Artist Summer Institute presented by the Lower Manhattan Cultural Council and Creative Capital. Along with fifty-four other NYC artists, yesterday I learned about strategic planning and business planning for my career. Today was focused on marketing. I am making so many great connections and am beyond inspired by all the other artists. Continue reading

Marketing as Self-Definition

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¡Viva las Roots! at Intermedia Arts, Robert Karimi, 2011

If marketing leaves you feeling uneasy, reconsider how you approach it. For artists, marketing is an exercise in self-definition, not self-promotion. Your marketing strategy should echo your ideas and intentions. Creative Capital consultant Brian Tate identifies seven principles as a framework to implement and analyze his own strategic marketing plan. This post looks specifically at the elements of the story, the message, the audience and call to action. Brian will discuss using the seven principles in depth on Monday, July 27 in his popular Seven Elements of Strategic Marketing webinar.

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It Takes a Team: Five Questions for Byron Au Yong

Byron Au Yong at Sundance Institute; photo by Fred Hayes

Byron Au Yong is a composer, Creative Capital awardee, and leader of our “Art Business Management” webinar for the Professional Development Program (PDP). His interdisciplinary projects, scored for voices with Asian, European and handmade instruments, have been performed in concert halls, festivals, theaters, museums, and site-specific locations. We had a few questions for Byron about his creative work and how he manages it. For more, be sure to check out Byron’s webinar on Thursday, May 21.

Hannah Fenlon: Your work has been performed in all kinds of places. What are some of your favorites? Any non-traditional spaces that really stand out in your memory?

Byron Au Yong: My favorite places and presenters provide multiple access points to develop and think about a project. American Conservatory Theatre in San Francisco, the International Festival of Arts & Ideas in New Haven, and Sundance Institute Theatre residencies around North America were crucial in supporting my Creative Capital project, STUCK ELEVATOR, and other shows.

In my hometown, favorite venues include On the Boards, Seattle Art Museum and Seattle Theatre Group’s Moore Theater. Memorable non-traditional spaces include 64 waterways for KIDNAPPING WATER: BOTTLED OPERAS thanks to guidance from 4Culture’s Site-Specific Performance Network and Jack Straw New Media Gallery. I am blessed to continue working outdoors along the water with performances of TURBINE, June 27th & 28th, 2015, commissioned by Leah Stein Dance Company and Mendelssohn Club of Philadelphia for the 200th anniversary of the Fairmount Water Works.

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Emily Johnson’s SHORE Celebrates the Places Where Landscapes and Bodies Meet and Merge

Emily Johnson/Catalyst (2013 Performing Arts) is bringing the expansive installation SHORE to New York this month, with gatherings and events throughout the city (April 19-26) and performances at New York Live Arts (April 23-25). SHORE expands beyond the theater to celebrate the places where we meet and merge—land and water; performer and audience; art and community; past, present, and future.

Throughout her work, Johnson asks: How can performance uniquely connect us to our land, our lives and each other? A native of Alaska who is based in Minneapolis, Johnson has spent the past four months working with community partners to plan this locally-specific version of SHORE in New York City, or as the Native Americans called it, Lenapehoking (“land of the Lenape”). She describes the events planned for SHORE in Lenapehoking: “SHORE moves, over the course of a week, from the dunes in the Rockaways, to the East River estuary, onto and into New York Harbor, over Minetta Creek, to the banks and buoyancy of Newtown Creek. We’ll listen to stories, we’ll work together, we’ll share food and this performance, taking care of what we need to care for. We’ll walk and bike and canoe and celebrate.” Continue reading

Applying to Creative Capital? What you need to know

A still from 2013 Performing Arts Awardee Kyle Abraham's "Pavement." Photo by Carrie Schneider.

A still from 2013 Performing Arts Awardee Kyle Abraham’s “Pavement.” Photo by Carrie Schneider.

Today, we begin accepting applications for Creative Capital’s Awards in Emerging Fields, Literature and Performing Arts, due Monday, March 2 at 4pm EST. We’d like to take a moment to tell you about ourselves and the award, and to answer some of our most frequently asked questions.

What distinguishes Creative Capital from more traditional funders?
Now in our second decade, Creative Capital continues to consider itself the premiere provider of risk capital in the arts—taking chances on projects that are singularly bold, innovative and genre-stretching. We want to support the latest thinking in the field: ideas of scope and ambition expressed through audacious combinations of form and content; varied projects that engage or even create new technologies; and works that take traditional approaches into new territories, teaching us something new about the world and ourselves. We often provide early support for projects that initially have challenges receiving funding from other sources. Continue reading

The Art of Conversation: Five Questions for Moira Brennan

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Moira Brennan leads a session at the Theatre Communications Group National Conference in 2010.

Moira Brennan is an arts writer and Program Director of the MAP Fund. On Monday, January 19, she will host a live, online discussion with cultural producer and performance curator Caleb Hammons. This webinar is the first performing arts edition of our Conversations Inside series. To be a part of the conversation, register here.

We had a chance to ask Moira some questions about her upcoming webinar series, in addition to a few things we just wanted her opinion on:
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Say Something Ridiculous – Celebrating With Champagne Jerry

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Leading up to Thanksgiving, Creative Capital celebrated their 15th anniversary with a series of performances at Joe’s Pub running Monday November 24 through Wednesday November 26. The week kicked off with a champagne toast from none-other than Champagne Jerry and his entourage, the Champagne Club, featuring Max Tannone, Sophia Cleary, Gillian Walsh, Farris Craddock, with an appearance by Beastie Boys’ Ad-Rock. I was sold from the get go—a ruckus entrance with confetti poppers and table dancing—and kept laughing through the epic, melting, slow motion finale. And I left with this piece of advice: “Say something ridiculous.” So in the spirit of the hilarity that ensued that evening, I caught up with Neal Medlyn (2013 Performing Arts), aka Champagne Jerry, for a conversation on celebration.

Brighid Greene: Creative Capital is celebrating 15 years; what were you up to 15 years ago?

Neal Medlyn: Fifteen years ago I was living in Texas playing experimental noise music in coffee shops for horrified people. I was a few months out from quitting my noise band, taking my boom box to various cafes and galleries in Austin, and putting on Lionel Richie songs and running amok in front of horrified Austinites.

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10 Things You Might Not Know About Meredith Monk

Meredith Monk

In 1964 American composer and musician Meredith Monk (2000 Performing Arts) came to New York to begin an incredibly prolific and inspirational career. 50 years later multiple venues and institutions are celebrating her time in New York. Early in Creative Capital’s history, Monk received a grant for her work mercy, a collaboration with Ann Hamilton. As Creative Capital and Meredith Monk both celebrate important anniversary milestones, we thought we would do our part in honoring the artist by presenting 10 things you might not know about her work.

1. She’s a filmmaker too?!

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As the New York Times wrote in 1990: Monk has created “dances that were operas, operas that were dances and mythic theater pieces that were operas and dances. To complicate matters, Ms. Monk is also a filmmaker…” One of her films, Book of Dayswas a visceral flirtation with a television audience in the early 90s.

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Artist to Artist: Byron Au Yong Interviews Dohee Lee

Dohee Lee as MAGO. Photo by Pak Han

Dohee Lee as the Korean goddess Mago. Photo by Pak Han

As part of our Artist-to-Artist conversation series, Byron Au Yong (2009 Performing Arts) sat down with Dohee Lee (2013 Performing Arts) to learn more about Lee’s project MAGO, an immersive performance that blends traditional Korean arts and shamanism in a modern context. Drawing on Lee’s own family history and the current political and environmental crisis taking place in the South Korean island where she was born, Lee weaves myth, ritual, ancestors, memory, present and future into a powerful performance journey.

Byron Au Yong: You’ve been developing MAGO for a few years. This past year, there have been four seasonal ritual performances at Yerba Buena Center for the Arts, plus performances throughout the Bay Area related to this project. How have you been able to sustain this development and who has influenced your process?

Dohee Lee: Mago represents my creator goddess and my ancestors. They guide me in my dreams and during research. Anna Halprin [a pioneer in dance healing] encourages me to create my own way as an artist. She always points to my cultural background as a great resource. Her way of thinking and working gives me space to be who I am. Continue reading

Joe’s Pub Teams Up With Creative Capital for a 15th Anniversary Celebration!

Joe’s Pub at The Public joins Creative Capital’s 15th anniversary celebration with a slate of performances by some of New York’s most adventurous and exciting artists—Lisa Kron, Danny Hoch, Kalup Linzy, Jomama Jones & Samora Pinderhughes, and Champagne Jerry. Running November 24-26, the series exemplifies the shared goal of both organizations to support innovative artists making interdisciplinary work. Tickets ($15-20) are now available online.

“We are thrilled to be collaborating with Joe’s Pub on this great series featuring Creative Capital’s performing arts awardees,” said Ruby Lerner, Founding Executive Director, Creative Capital. “All of us at Creative Capital are huge fans of Joe’s Pub, and it’s wonderful to celebrate our shared commitment to supporting adventurous artists over the past 15 years.” Continue reading