MAP Fund’s 2016 Grantees: Themes and Connections

From Jen Shyu's performance of "Song for Naldo"

From Jen Shyu’s performance of “Song for Naldo”

Today, one of our ancillary programs, the MAP Fund, announced their 2016 round of artist projects. Thirty-six new works in contemporary performing arts will receive a total of $1.1 million in direct support for project development, creation and premiere.

We noticed some interesting themes and connections between the new projects, so to get a better sense of them, let’s take a look at a few.

Rural Communities
A few projects this year are focused on rural communities outside the large metropolises in the U.S. where arts programs are typically focused. Roadside Theater, a part of Appalshop, an multidisciplinary arts organization in Appalachia, will produce Performing Our Rural Future, a musical play about the end of coal mining and the rise of a younger generation committed to a better life founded on a just economy. The organizations will collaborate with people based in Letcher County, Kentucky, which has one of the richest cultural heritages in the U.S., but is the poorest and sickest congressional district in the nation.

Multilingual artist Jen Shyu performs the musical Song of Silver Geese in six languages: English, Taiwanese, Tetum of East Timor, Korean, Javanese and Indonesian. If that’s not impressive enough, Jen plans on bringing the musical drama to all 50 states, focusing on small towns less exposed to cross-cultural and innovative art.

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It’s Gonna Be May: Summer Opportunities For Artists

2015 Artist-In-Residence David Shrove hosting his monthly studio visit. Photo" Michael Palma. Courtesy of the Sugar Hill Children's Museum of Art & Storytelling.

2015 Artist-In-Residence David Shrove hosting his monthly studio visit. Photo: Michael Palma. Courtesy of the Sugar Hill Children’s Museum of Art & Storytelling.

To quote our favorite teen boyband (and accompanying meme)—guess what: it’s gonna be May. If you’ve been waiting all spring to get yourself together and apply for that one residency (or grant, or open call)—now’s a pretty good time. If your a visual artists or a writer, this coming month is filled with exciting international opportunities to either work in isolated and inspiring spaces or incubate within an community. We’ve listed our favorite picks, all for free or with a stipend. Go forth!

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“The System Isn’t Broken. It’s Working Exactly As Intended”

We kicked off a series of artist discussions, called Creative Conversations, on April 19 that asks artists how they are dealing with important social issues. In the first part of our series we brought five Creative Capital artists together to discuss how they are using their practice to address criminal justice and mass incarceration. You can watch the full video above, or check out highlights from Twitter below on our Storify. Hope you enjoy!

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Your Blog Won a Grant: Now What? – Arts Blogging, Part 1

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Nate Larson and Marni Shindelman, “Geolocation.” From Kate Albers’ interview with the artists on her blog Circulation/Exchange

Blogs are by no means new, but the Creative Capital | Andy Warhol Foundation Arts Writers Grant category for blogging is still a unique award in its field. In some cases, it can be the only way arts writers can earn money for their personal blogs. In addition to issuing awards for articles, books, and short-form writing, the Arts Writers Grant Program supports bloggers writing on a range of art issues.

Since the Arts Writers Grant Program is now accepting applications through May 18, I wanted to get a sense of how bloggers specifically have used their award, so I reached out to a few past awardees. Their answers were so informative and important, that I will divide the interviews into a three part series.

The bloggers who contributed to this series are: Kate Albers who maintains Circulation/Exchange, featuring short critical essays exploring the intersection of social media and photography. Daniel Temkin’s esoteric.codes documents the history of obscure programming language and bridges the hacker and arts community. Founded in 2007, Sharon Butler’s Two Coats of Paint publishes commentary about painting, artist interviews and studio visits. And Gelare Khoshgozaran and Eungsong Kim’s contemptorary—which recently went live—is devoted to alternative and emerging artistic practices by women of color, queer and immigrant artists in the U.S.

Part I: So Your Blog Got a Grant—What Happens Now?

Writers who win grants for their blog don’t always just use the money to pay the rent and keep writing. Sometimes the money also helps them rethink their whole angle or go deeper into their subject.

Kate Albers: The grant allowed me to take two semesters of sabbatical (instead of one) from my faculty position at the University of Arizona. It really went entirely to this, straight income replacement. So while the money was spent on pretty mundane things—like rent, groceries, and child care—what it really funded was those extra months of time without teaching or university service responsibilities that I wouldn’t have had otherwise. The value of this is incalculable, and goes well beyond the parameters of what appears on Circulation/Exchange.

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Planting Seeds: Tracie Holder on Grantwriting

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Tracie Holder at the Scottish Documentary Institute

Tracie Holder learns how to tell her stories by first telling them to funders. As an award-winning filmmaker, fundraising consultant and engagement campaign specialist currently working with Women Make Movies, Tracie has raised an impressive $2 million for her projects from a mix of government funders, private foundations and individuals. On April 28th she’ll be leading her webinar, Grantwriting For Artists, covering all aspects of compelling and successful grantwriting for artists working in all disciplines. We talked to Tracie about how she got her chops in grantwriting and how artists can incorporate their search for funding into their creative practice.

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Check out this year’s projects “On Our Radar”!

On our Radar 2016We are pleased to announce the launch of Creative Capital’s On Our Radar site for 2016, featuring nearly 300 artists’ projects from across the country!

In our ongoing efforts to find innovative ways to support artists, we created On Our Radar, a searchable database featuring noteworthy Emerging Fields, Literature and Performing Arts projects that advanced to the second or third round in last year’s highly competitive award selection process. Although the featured projects were not ultimately funded by Creative Capital, we feel they are projects to watch and we invite you to explore them. Continue reading

Get That Commission: Lynn Basa On Going Public

Lynn's installation “Grove” in Claremont, California.

Lynn Basa’s installation, “Grove,” in Claremont, California.

Lynn Basa knows a thing or two about making art in public. The painter, sculptor and former instructor at the the School of the Art Institute of Chicago centers her practice around public commissions—colorful mosaics that cover schools, parks, bus stops, or movie theaters. On April 14, she will lead Demystifying Public Art, a webinar focused on all aspects of researching and applying for public art commissions for visual artists. We had the chance to talk with Lynn about her current work, how to reach out to your local government, and why artists should buy their buildings.

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Announcing Creative Conversations: Criminal Justice

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Clockwise from top: Maria Gaspar, Paul Rucker, Shawn Peters, Michelle Coffey, Gregory Sale, Nick Szuberla

Starting Tuesday, April 19, something big is coming to New York. Ok, it’s the New York primaries (please vote!), but it will also be the first in our series of Creative Conversations, a panel of artists addressing critical issues. In this first discussion, we will gather five Creative Capital-supported artists who are addressing criminal justice and mass incarceration in their work: Maria Gaspar, Shawn Peters, Paul Rucker, Gregory Sale and Nick Szuberla. And we’re so happy that Michelle Coffey, Executive Director of the Lambent Foundation, will moderate the conversation!

We will livestream the conversation (RSVP here) from 6-8 EST on Tuesday, April 19, and take questions from Twitter, so use the hashtag #CreativeConvos and our handle @creativecap to follow along! In the meantime, read on to learn more about the presenting artists.

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Janine Antoni Uses Movement to Look Back in “Ally”

anine Antoni in collaboration with Anna Halprin, Paper Dance, 2013. Photographed by: Pak Han at the Halprin Dance Deck. © Janine Antoni; Courtesy of the artist and The Fabric Workshop and Museum, Philadelphia.

Janine Antoni in collaboration with Anna Halprin, Paper Dance, 2013. Photographed by: Pak Han at the Halprin Dance Deck. © Janine Antoni; Courtesy of the artist and The Fabric Workshop and Museum, Philadelphia.

This month, Janine Antoni (2012 Visual Arts) premieres her Creative Capital-supported project, Ally, at The Fabric Workshop and Museum in Philadelphia (opening April 21). Ally is an exhibition of art and dance conceived and performed by Antoni in collaboration with choreographer Stephen Petronio and movement artist Anna Halprin. Taking the form of performances, installation environments, videos and sculptures, Ally will occupy four floors of the museum for three months, with weekly live performances. A book will follow, edited by the British writer and performance scholar Adrian Heathfield.

Antoni writes, “I conceived of this project more than six years ago as a kind of retrospective of my art making, told through dance. It has evolved into a truly collaborative creation that allows us to find a way to continue making new work while looking back.”

Ally is comprised of four projects: Rope Dance, an improvised performance instigated by Halprin, who presented a rope to Antoni and Petronio to be used as a tool to connect their bodies and draw lines through space; Swallow, a complex installation based on a performance by Antoni and Petronio, who connected from the gut using a 10-foot strip of woven cloth; The Courtesan and the Crone, a dance of seduction originally created and performed by Halprin in 1999, reimagined here in a different gender and generational context as a solo performance by Petronio; and Paper Dance, an improvised performance by Antoni with rolls of brown paper in an environment that refers to both Antoni and Halprin’s artistic histories.

I connected with Janine to learn more about the development of Ally and her deeply collaborative process.

Jenny Gill: The works in Ally all sound incredibly complex and layered, but Paper Dance strikes me as particularly rich. Not only is it a weekly performance, but it is performed within a “set” of crated artworks from your artistic history. With each performance, you unpack and repack different artworks, so over the course of the 14 weeks of the show, a mini-retrospective of your past work emerges. Can you talk more about the role of these artworks in the performance and the exhibition?

Janine Antoni: When I first conceived of my project for Creative Capital, I wanted to make a retrospective of my work in dance. For me, it was a way to look back with the intention of moving forward. It was Anna Halprin’s idea to take a section of her work Parades and Changes (1965) as a score for me to do as a solo—she presented me with the rolls of paper she originally used to create that piece.

In the process of improvising movement with the paper, I started to notice how images from my past artworks were presenting themselves to me. It became clear that the lessons learned in the making and the conceptual concerns of my work have etched themselves into my psyche. In Paper Dance, there is a beautiful symmetry as both Anna and I are reconfiguring our pasts. Continue reading