Tell A Good Story: Sascha Freudenheim & Alina Sumajin on Public Relations

An artist at a recent Creative Capital workshop

An artist at a recent Creative Capital workshop.

Ever wonder how artists get written about in the press? Often artists with representation—a gallery, or an agent—will leave public relations work in someone else’s hands. But artists in every stage of their careers can learn a thing or two about good PR strategies and take their press outreach into their own hands. Next week, our Professional Development Program is producing a brand new workshop in our New York City offices on public relations specifically for artists. We’re bringing in Sascha Freudenheim and Alina Sumajin from PAVE Communications and Consulting to lead PR For Working Artists: Strategies for Success on May 2nd. We spoke to Sascha and Alina about the difference between marketing and PR and how to get your press release to stand out from the inbox slush pile. 

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Avoid “Artspeak”: Kirby Tepper On Talking Straight

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Kirby Tepper leading a workshop for Creative Capital’s Professional Development Program.

Kirby Tepper is a man of many talents: actor and educator are just a few of the hats he wears beyond the confines of his day job as a licensed psychotherapist. The same interpersonal expertise that makes him valuable to the clients in his practice also serves to empower his artist peers. Though he particularly enjoys working with artists, Kirby has helped people from many backgrounds, including doctors, writers and lawyers, find a more confident, direct communications style. On May 2, Kirby will be giving a webinar on Effective Negotiation For Artists, where participants will learn how to ask for what they deserve with confidence. We asked him about his theatrical inspirations and the don’ts of artist communication. 

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New Jersey Artists Grow With Our Blended Learning Program

A photo Christy took of her name badge and the PDP materials at the workshop in Trenton, NJ.

A photo Christy took of her name badge and the PDP materials at the workshop in Trenton, NJ.

The Professional Development program has launched a new blog that chronicles New Jersey artists’ growth and process through our Blended Learning Program. Blended Learning is a multi-format course in financial and business management that helps artists establish a secure base upon which to create and grow their work. Thanks to the generous support from the Geraldine R. Dodge Foundation, Creative Capital’s Professional Development Program was able to bring Blended Learning to the artists of two communities in New Jersey—in Trenton and Newark. 

We’ve asked them to share their stories throughout their journey—testimonies of what they’ve learned, the questions they still have, the strategies they’re trying out, and the results they’re seeing in their art and in their life. Here’s one of our entries from artist Christy O’Connor, who took part in the Blended Learning workshop in Trenton on April 3, 2016.

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It’s Gonna Be May: Summer Opportunities For Artists

2015 Artist-In-Residence David Shrove hosting his monthly studio visit. Photo" Michael Palma. Courtesy of the Sugar Hill Children's Museum of Art & Storytelling.

2015 Artist-In-Residence David Shrove hosting his monthly studio visit. Photo: Michael Palma. Courtesy of the Sugar Hill Children’s Museum of Art & Storytelling.

To quote our favorite teen boyband (and accompanying meme)—guess what: it’s gonna be May. If you’ve been waiting all spring to get yourself together and apply for that one residency (or grant, or open call)—now’s a pretty good time. If your a visual artists or a writer, this coming month is filled with exciting international opportunities to either work in isolated and inspiring spaces or incubate within an community. We’ve listed our favorite picks, all for free or with a stipend. Go forth!

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Your Blog Won a Grant: Now What? – Arts Blogging, Part 1

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Nate Larson and Marni Shindelman, “Geolocation.” From Kate Albers’ interview with the artists on her blog Circulation/Exchange

Blogs are by no means new, but the Creative Capital | Andy Warhol Foundation Arts Writers Grant category for blogging is still a unique award in its field. In some cases, it can be the only way arts writers can earn money for their personal blogs. In addition to issuing awards for articles, books, and short-form writing, the Arts Writers Grant Program supports bloggers writing on a range of art issues.

Since the Arts Writers Grant Program is now accepting applications through May 18, I wanted to get a sense of how bloggers specifically have used their award, so I reached out to a few past awardees. Their answers were so informative and important, that I will divide the interviews into a three part series.

The bloggers who contributed to this series are: Kate Albers who maintains Circulation/Exchange, featuring short critical essays exploring the intersection of social media and photography. Daniel Temkin’s esoteric.codes documents the history of obscure programming language and bridges the hacker and arts community. Founded in 2007, Sharon Butler’s Two Coats of Paint publishes commentary about painting, artist interviews and studio visits. And Gelare Khoshgozaran and Eungsong Kim’s contemptorary—which recently went live—is devoted to alternative and emerging artistic practices by women of color, queer and immigrant artists in the U.S.

Part I: So Your Blog Got a Grant—What Happens Now?

Writers who win grants for their blog don’t always just use the money to pay the rent and keep writing. Sometimes the money also helps them rethink their whole angle or go deeper into their subject.

Kate Albers: The grant allowed me to take two semesters of sabbatical (instead of one) from my faculty position at the University of Arizona. It really went entirely to this, straight income replacement. So while the money was spent on pretty mundane things—like rent, groceries, and child care—what it really funded was those extra months of time without teaching or university service responsibilities that I wouldn’t have had otherwise. The value of this is incalculable, and goes well beyond the parameters of what appears on Circulation/Exchange.

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Planting Seeds: Tracie Holder on Grantwriting

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Tracie Holder at the Scottish Documentary Institute

Tracie Holder learns how to tell her stories by first telling them to funders. As an award-winning filmmaker, fundraising consultant and engagement campaign specialist currently working with Women Make Movies, Tracie has raised an impressive $2 million for her projects from a mix of government funders, private foundations and individuals. On April 28th she’ll be leading her webinar, Grantwriting For Artists, covering all aspects of compelling and successful grantwriting for artists working in all disciplines. We talked to Tracie about how she got her chops in grantwriting and how artists can incorporate their search for funding into their creative practice.

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Where In The World Will You Make Art?

A project completed by Devan Shimoyama during the Fire Island Artist Residency.

A project completed by Devan Shimoyama during the Fire Island Artist Residency.

Sometimes what you need is space—physical and psychic—to fully engage in your practice. Whether you are an artist, performer, or writer, one of the perks of living creatively is that your work can flourish in many different contexts and many different cities. Have you ever asked: What would it be like to paint on the shores of Romania? Or work on an experimental theatre project in Ireland? Or write next to a lake in central Mexico? With the residencies and open calls we’ve found for you, all for free or with a stipend, the opportunity is yours for the taking.

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From Funders to Family: Five Questions for Stephanie Pereira

Stephanie Pereira

Stephanie leads a workshop on how to use Kickstarter.

Stephanie Pereira is Kickstarter’s Director of Community Education. Trained as an artist, Stephanie spent the first ten years of her career in the nonprofit arts world, before joining Kickstarter in 2011 as the Director of the Art Program. In her current role, Stephanie develops tools and resources for the creative community at-large to be able to realize their creative ideas. 

On Monday, March 21st at 7pm EST, Stephanie presents her “Kickstarter School” webinar, an invaluable primer on how to bring a Kickstarter project to life. She will take a look at some successful projects from across the site and explore what kind of rewards work best, how to spread the word about your project, and other helpful tips. 

We had a chance to ask Stephanie a few questions about her experience as an artist, curator and funder, as well as get her tips on building a strong creative community.

Hannah Fenlon: Tell me about your transition from art school to Kickstarter. How did your artistic training impact what you’re currently doing?

Stephanie Pereira: While I was in art school I realized two things. First, while I love the creative process and making art, I am not an artist. The other thing that I learned was that I loved organizing events and exhibitions with my friends. I was naturally good at it, and it gave me great satisfaction to bring more creative ideas to the world. By the time I graduated, my artistic practice had even drifted into event production, with installation work that was designed to interrogate the traditional gallery-going experience and transform space through engagement. It’s been well over a decade since I attended art school but the education I got there has stuck with me. The lens through which I look at the world is endlessly creative, project oriented, iterative and (I hope) generous. Because my school had a strong emphasis on critical theory, I am also not content to make work in my professional life that is lazy or represents the status quo.
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Kickstarter School: Learning to Connect

Kickstarter: "Bring Creative Projects to Life"On Monday, March 21st at 7pm EST, Kickstarter Director of Community Education Stephanie Pereira presents her “Kickstarter School” webinar, an invaluable primer on how to bring a Kickstarter project to life. Stephanie will take a look at some successful projects from across the site and explore what kind of rewards work best, how to spread the word about your project, and other helpful tips. Below, Stephanie shares a few of her notes on what makes a strong Kickstarter project, as well as examples of some successfully funded projects.

Kickstarter can be a powerful tool for artists and arts organizations. If used well, your Kickstarter project is not only an opportunity to raise money for an important project, but also a way to introduce a project to a new audience. Continue reading

We Got Your Back: Residencies and Opportunities

Pu'u o Pele and Pu'u o Maui cinder cones in Haleakala Crater; Haleakala National Park, Maui, Hawaii.

Want to work here? You can! Check out the Haleakala National Park residency below.

We get it. Artists have to juggle side jobs, main jobs, parenting, commissions, renting studios and on top of all that are expected to fully engage in their practice. It seems impossible, but luckily there are some organizations like ours that have artists in mind. We’ve compiled a list of residencies that allow you time and space, and most are either free or offer stipends. Check them out below.

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