Alex Teplitzky

About Alex Teplitzky

Alex Teplitzky studies and implements tools for arts organizations and artists to express themselves on the web and through social media. He has worked for a wide variety of galleries and museums including the de Young Museum in San Francisco, Claire Oliver Gallery, the Jen Bekman Gallery, the Richard Feigen Gallery and Ray Johnson Estate. In 2010, Alex moved to New York to study at the Draper John W. Draper Graduate Program at NYU where he wrote his thesis on artists' visual deconstruction of the media's representation of terrorism and violence. He has written arts articles for Art F City, Hyperallergic, Eros Mortis and he manages an art blog called Tout Petit la Planète. He also DJs at various venues in New York City under the alias Nabocough. He has worked as Communications Associate at Creative Capital since 2014.

5 Quick Tips to Achieve Wikipedia Recognition

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So, you have your artist statement, your website, and you’ve signed up for every social media platform under the sun; but if you see Wikipedia as the final frontier in gaining online recognition for your career, you’re not alone.  In conversations with the artists Creative Capital supports, I have heard from a lot of people who have tried in vain to publish a Wikipedia article. And though the online-based encyclopedia is not without its own complications, it is undoubtedly a way to gain credibility.

In the past few months, I have endeavored to help Creative Capital artists write and publish Wikipedia articles. It’s been a learning process for me and them, and I am by no means an expert on Wikipedia. However, I’ve put together a few quick tips to help you get started!

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The Arts Writers Grant Program Announces 2016 Grantees

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Photo from “Transplant Exploits: Detroit’s Savior Complex” on ARTS.BLACK by Taylor Aldridge

The Creative Capital | Andy Warhol Foundation Arts Writers Grant Program is pleased to announce the recipients of its 2016 grants. Designed to support writing about contemporary art, as well as to create a broader audience for arts writing, the program aims to strengthen the field as a whole and to ensure that critical writing remains a valued mode of engaging the visual arts.

In its 2016 cycle, the Arts Writers Grant Program has awarded a total of $695,000 to twenty writers. Ranging from $15,000 to $50,000 in four categories—articles, blogs, books and short-form writing—these grants support projects addressing both general and specialized art audiences, from scholarly studies to self-published blogs.

It’s an exciting bunch of writers and scholars! Check it out below, as well as a closer look at one project from each category.

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Creative Capital Artists and Their Work Head to Miami

It’s that time of year again when artists head to Miami for the numerous art fairs. If you’re in town, be sure to check out these Creative Capital artists around town. The fairs are open Dec 1-4.

Art Basel Miami Fair
Edgar Arceneaux, Galerie Nathalle Obadia
Sanford Biggers, David Castillo Gallery
Nick Cave, Jack Shainman Gallery
Jennie C. Jones, Sikkema Jenkins & Co.
Simone Leigh, Luhring Augustine
Jillian Mayer, Film Program
Carlos Motta, P.P.O.W.
Pat O’Neill, Cherry and Martin
Pope.L, Mitchell-Innes & Nash

NADA Fair
Nancy Davidson, Lord Ludd Gallery
Beatriz Santiago Muñoz, Galería Agustina Ferreyra
Chemi Rosado-Seijo, Proyectos Ultravioleta

Art Miami
Joan Waltemath, C. Grimaldis Gallery
Brittany Nelson, David Klein Gallery
Angel Nevarez and Valerie Tevere, Context Art Miami Sound Positions

Untitled Art Fair
Ken Gonzales-Day, Luis de Jesus Los Angeles
Sandford Biggers, Monique Meloche

Pulse Miami Beach
Ann Hamilton, Elizabeth Leach Gallery

Other venues:

Perez Art Museum Miami
Jillian Mayer, Slumpies
Carlos Motta, Histories for the Future

Vizcaya Museum
Yara Travieso

Lowe Art Museum at University of Florida
Titus Kaphar, The Vesper Project

The Vitality of Daring Artists Has Never Been More Important

The vitality of daring artists has never been more important than in this particular moment of turbulence in America.

We know these are trying times, and if you’re a person of color, a woman, an immigrant living in the U.S., if you’re Muslim or Jewish, a person with disabilities or if you’re part of the LGBTQ community, or someone who endeavors to act in ally-ship, this election result might feel like a personal attack. We acknowledge your feelings of vulnerability are not entirely unique to this moment, but that they may well be heightened right now. And while we are always striving to make ourselves better as an organization and as individuals in order to better serve our community, we felt it necessary to let you know that we are here for you.

Creative Capital was founded on a strong belief that artists’ voices should be heard and protected, no matter who maintains political power. Today, we take a moment to stand firmly behind this mission. We affirm our commitment to supporting artists as they build sustainable careers, form communities and movements, and use their practice to confront injustice. While we plan for the uncertainty of the coming years, we take solace in knowing that many of you are working hard every day to make this world a better, more inclusive place.

Below we share reactions to the election from artists we’ve supported and, with an eye to sustainability, resources for self-care and community building. We welcome you to share your own in the comments of this blog post or on Facebook.

– Suzy and the staff at Creative Capital.

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Congratulations to Paul Beatty on winning the Man Booker Prize!

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Paul Beatty became the first American to win the Man Booker Prize with his book, The Sellout. According to the New York Times, the judges were unanimous in their decision, citing the novel’s “inventive comic approach to the thorny issues of racial identity and injustice.” The book received a Creative Capital award in 2009, and it was published in 2015 by Farrar, Straus and Giroux.

In an interview ahead of the release of The Sellout, Paul Beatty told us, “when I write I have a general idea of where the exit is, but it takes forever for me to get there.” After having funded Paul’s work seven years ago, it’s a huge deal to see him win this prestigious prize. Congratulations Paul! All of us at Creative Capital are so happy to see that your hard work has paid off, and we’re so thrilled to have been able to help along the way!

Read the New York Times article about the award ceremony

Buy the book on Amazon

Read our 2015 interview with Paul Beatty

Creative Capital staff reading The Sellout in the office!

Creative Capital staff reading The Sellout in the office!

Brittany Nelson Upends Tradition By Misusing Dangerous Photographic Processes

Nowadays, photography is perhaps the one artistic medium with which literally everyone has some experience. And that’s what makes Brittany Nelson’s work so important. Her Creative Capital project, Alternative Process, opens November 5 at David Klein Gallery. Typical of her process, the work shows the various way in which Nelson has been able to playfully experiment with and trouble outdated photographic processes to create abstract work. Unlike other mediums, photography, in particular, has a long history of perpetuating tradition. By experimenting with processes, Nelson challenges these traditions, which, as she explains, is a white male dominated art form. We caught up with Brittany to find out more about her work.

Alex Teplitzky: Can you talk about the show at David Klein Gallery: what are the themes that tie the work together?

Brittany Nelson: My Creative Capital project has really been a series of solo exhibitions this year leading up to “Alternative Process.” It was perhaps an unusual situation because I have been showing the work as I develop it. Starting with “The Year I Make Contact” at Morgan Lehman in NYC, “Controller” at Patron in Chicago, and landing in Detroit in November at David Klein Gallery; all new work was created for every exhibition, and each show centered around its own sub-theme. “The Year I Make Contact” centered around themes of evolution. “Controller” focused on the idea of mirroring and movement with ties back to very early astronomical photography, and “Alternative Process” is being created around ideas of time (as a physical quantity).

All of these exhibitions and the body of work at large center around major themes of communication/transmissions, future artifacts, abstraction as the philosophical ideal, and of course the history of photography. Alternative Process features a collection of tintypes on brushed silver aluminum that contain various recreations and reinterpretations of science graphics. I have been flipping through a large quantity of books on astronomy and theoretical physics, specifically looking at the graphs and charts that have been created as an attempt to communicate very complex sets of knowledge as simply as possible. I have been very interested in these modes of communication by both how succinct they are, but in the ways in which they fail to cause a comprehensive understanding. This segues into the thoughts behind designing the Golden Record that went out on the Voyager spacecraft, and how you design something for a brain and logic system you can’t comprehend. I think of the tintypes this way: as an alien or future artifact. In this instance, though, the aliens I’m trying to communicate with are the gallery patrons.

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Complex Movements Honor Decentralized Networks and Resilience

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Complex Movements on stage

“How do we build movements where there are many leaders?” wonders Carlos Garcia in a recent interview. That’s just one question at the heart of Beware of the Dandelions by the Detroit-based collective Complex Movements. The Creative Capital-supported project is a traveling, video installation pod which is activated through community and audience engagement, hip hop and science fiction narrative that mutates depending on where it’s performed. The collaboration started out of a conversation that stemmed from dissatisfaction that live hip hop was limited to the usual on-stage performance. The group—made up of Invincible/ill Weaver, Waajeed, Wes Taylor and Carlos Garcia—decided to explore social injustice they experience in Detroit and critical theory they were reading about through a multi-disciplinary project. Beware of the Dandelions has traveled to Seattle and Dallas, among other cities, but it premieres Oct 6-31 at Talking Dolls, as part of a “homecoming” to their native Detroit. An album by the same name is also available for sale. To get a better idea of what the project as a whole is, we caught up with the group.

Alex Teplitzky: Beware of the Dandelions places audience members in the middle of a science fictional dystopia. You’re from Detroit, a city I have read a lot about but have only visited quickly. To outsiders, the connection between reality and science fiction doesn’t seem far off. Is that a misguided judgment on my part?

Complex Movements: Many of the story elements of the science fiction parable Beware of the Dandelions are based on recent stranger-than-fiction events in our city and state, such as mass land grabs by billionaires speculating hundreds of acres of land under the guise of apple orchards (and tree farms), water being shutoff and poisoned, state of the art surveillance systems run by corporate moguls, and life extension seeking cryogenics facilities to name a few.

One of our project’s inspirations, (Detroit philosopher and activist) Grace Lee Boggs used to say “Detroit is what the country has to look forward to” partly because many of racist/colonial capitalism’s practices were piloted here, and subsequently, many of the community led strategies to address the crises created by those practices were also ingeniously created and innovated here.

Detroit is also a science fiction mecca including techno legends Underground Resistance and Drexciya, authors like adrienne maree brown and Saladin AhmedIngrid Lafleur’s Afrotopia project, and beyond.

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George Legrady’s 1973 Photographs of the Cree People Are Now Online

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An Inuit woman, Maggie Ekoomiak, living in a Cree community in James Bay with artist George Legrady in the background

In 1973, 23-year old George Legrady (2002 Emerging Fields) was invited by the Cree indigenous communities to photograph their way of life. The Cree people were about to enter negotiations to dispute a dam project that would flood land they had lived on for millennia. Recently, George received funding to digitally archive these photographs. Looking at them, I found a striking similarity between that moment in 1973 and the one we are living in now, as 280 First Nations tribes have convened to protest the construction of an oil pipeline in North Dakota. Wanting to learn more, I asked George to select a few images and share his experience.

I am a digital media artist who has worked with integrating computation with conceptual art and photography since the mid-1980s. I received a Creative Capital award in 2002 for a project called Speaking/Sensing Space.

My first major project as an artist began in 1973, when I visited the James Bay Cree indigenous communities in northern Quebec. I took about 3,200 photos while living with the Cree over the course of 8 to 12 weeks (about 41 images a day). The return visits which took place with two McGill University ethnographers and my art colleague, Andres Burbano from Bogota, provided insight as to how a culture changes over time.

In 2012, I received a National Science Foundation Arctic Social Science grant to digitize the photographs and revisit the Cree to present the images back to the communities. Of the existing photos, I have digitized and archived about 700 to be used by the Cree and ethnographers. Below is a selection of 3 x 3 clusters of images from 1973 with anecdotal comments.
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Artists Head to Kentucky for IdeaFestival

Jeffrey Gibson's 2014 exhibition at Marc Strauss Gallery

Jeffrey Gibson’s 2014 exhibition at Marc Strauss Gallery

IdeaFestival is an annual event based in Louisville, Kentucky where innovators across all fields come together to talk about how their work precipitates change. Every year IdeaFestival invites Creative Capital to present a session called “Art at the Edge.” This year’s panel, taking place on September 29, is an exciting opportunity to give a platform to some of the artists we support.

This year, our Executive Director Suzy Delvalle will be joined onstage by artists Jeffrey Gibson, Heather Dewey-Hagborg, Shawn Peters and Phillip Andrews Lewis for the Creative Capital presentation.

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Two Academic Writers Learn to Unlearn and Build on Their Own

From "On Larry Lee's 'The (Un)Timely Death of Multiculturalism," by Eunsong Kim

From “On Larry Lee’s ‘The (Un)Timely Death of Multiculturalism,” by Eunsong Kim

In May, we spoke to a few arts bloggers who had won Arts Writers grants to maintain their blogs. One blog, contemptorary by writers Gelare Khoshgozaran and Eunsong Kim, was just beginning at the time. As of August, 2016, however, their project is well underway with articles on artists and arts exhibitions, like MOCA Los Angeles’s “What is Contemporary?” Their stated focus this year on women of color and indigenous on and overall hope to reframe marginalized voices in art history and criticism struck us as particularly important, so we reached out to the writers for further comment.

Alex Teplitzky: Your blog will profile women of color and indigenous women queering the art world. Can you go more into specifics about who you hope to profile or hear from? What convinced you to start this blog?

Gelare Khoshgozaran & Eunsong Kim: We introduce contemptorary as a “cyberspace project covering: women of color and indigenous women queering the art world; queers disrupting white hegemony: immigrants and those displaced due to war, occupation and colonialism who breach all terrains.”

We wanted to create a unique space dedicated to those who have been historically marginalized (or inevitably auto-marginalized), tokenized and alienated. We wanted to assert our taste and bring into light the works of those whom we deeply value and have been inspired by, (re)introduce their works in a new context and see how their different voices resonate together cacophonously.

We started contemptorary because we didn’t see anything that was like it. We also made this decision because we have been students and practitioners of the arts and our previous education, our assigned reading guidelines have not been enough. They were curricula that consistently left us needing to: unlearn and to research and build on our own. So we’re carving out a cyberspace that holds what we want to learn about, what we want to read about, what we want to see and share.

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