Go Beyond Google: Sharon Louden on Creative Research

Sharon teaching at Chautauqua.

Sharon teaching at Chautauqua Institution. Photo by Don Kimes.

Sharon Louden needs no introduction. A successful artist, editor, and advocate for artists, Sharon’s transparent and earnest approach to sustaining professional connections has made her four-part webinar, How to Approach and Engage with the Gatekeepers of the Art World, one of Creative Capital Professional Development Program’s most sought-out offerings. Back by popular demand, Sharon will be leading her series starting May 23rd.

Below you’ll find some tips adapted from Sharon’s course on “effective research” that we and past webinar participants have found useful. If you want to learn more about how to communicate and build relationships with other art world professionals, don’t forget to register for Sharon’s webinar.

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Come see us at CONTEXT NY, and Other Art Fair Happenings

As art fair week kicks off in New York, we are honored to join CONTEXT Art Fair as an official cultural partner, May 3-8 at Pier 94. We will be showcasing special editions by Creative Capital awardees Franco Mondini-RuizSimone LeighConnie SamarasEve Sussman, and SuttonBeresCuller in the VIP Lounge.  Here are some other Creative Capital artists to look out for this week in NYC.

FRIEZE NEW YORK
– Pope.L with Mitchell-Innes & Nash
– Carlos Motta with P.P.O.W.
– Eileen Myles will deliver a keynote, May 5 at 4pm
– Zach Blas joins the panel “Technological Body and Its Discontents,” May 6

NADA ART FAIR
– Ben Thorp Brown with Bischoff Projects

Tell A Good Story: Sascha Freudenheim & Alina Sumajin on Public Relations

An artist at a recent Creative Capital workshop

An artist at a recent Creative Capital workshop.

Ever wonder how artists get written about in the press? Often artists with representation—a gallery, or an agent—will leave public relations work in someone else’s hands. But artists in every stage of their careers can learn a thing or two about good PR strategies and take their press outreach into their own hands. Next week, our Professional Development Program is producing a brand new workshop in our New York City offices on public relations specifically for artists. We’re bringing in Sascha Freudenheim and Alina Sumajin from PAVE Communications and Consulting to lead PR For Working Artists: Strategies for Success on May 2nd. We spoke to Sascha and Alina about the difference between marketing and PR and how to get your press release to stand out from the inbox slush pile. 

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Avoid “Artspeak”: Kirby Tepper On Talking Straight

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Kirby Tepper leading a workshop for Creative Capital’s Professional Development Program.

Kirby Tepper is a man of many talents: actor and educator are just a few of the hats he wears beyond the confines of his day job as a licensed psychotherapist. The same interpersonal expertise that makes him valuable to the clients in his practice also serves to empower his artist peers. Though he particularly enjoys working with artists, Kirby has helped people from many backgrounds, including doctors, writers and lawyers, find a more confident, direct communications style. On May 2, Kirby will be giving a webinar on Effective Negotiation For Artists, where participants will learn how to ask for what they deserve with confidence. We asked him about his theatrical inspirations and the don’ts of artist communication. 

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New Jersey Artists Grow With Our Blended Learning Program

A photo Christy took of her name badge and the PDP materials at the workshop in Trenton, NJ.

A photo Christy took of her name badge and the PDP materials at the workshop in Trenton, NJ.

The Professional Development program has launched a new blog that chronicles New Jersey artists’ growth and process through our Blended Learning Program. Blended Learning is a multi-format course in financial and business management that helps artists establish a secure base upon which to create and grow their work. Thanks to the generous support from the Geraldine R. Dodge Foundation, Creative Capital’s Professional Development Program was able to bring Blended Learning to the artists of two communities in New Jersey—in Trenton and Newark. 

We’ve asked them to share their stories throughout their journey—testimonies of what they’ve learned, the questions they still have, the strategies they’re trying out, and the results they’re seeing in their art and in their life. Here’s one of our entries from artist Christy O’Connor, who took part in the Blended Learning workshop in Trenton on April 3, 2016.

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MAP Fund’s 2016 Grantees: Themes and Connections

From Jen Shyu's performance of "Song for Naldo"

From Jen Shyu’s performance of “Song for Naldo”

Today, one of our ancillary programs, the MAP Fund, announced their 2016 round of artist projects. Thirty-six new works in contemporary performing arts will receive a total of $1.1 million in direct support for project development, creation and premiere.

We noticed some interesting themes and connections between the new projects, so to get a better sense of them, let’s take a look at a few.

Rural Communities
A few projects this year are focused on rural communities outside the large metropolises in the U.S. where arts programs are typically focused. Roadside Theater, a part of Appalshop, an multidisciplinary arts organization in Appalachia, will produce Performing Our Rural Future, a musical play about the end of coal mining and the rise of a younger generation committed to a better life founded on a just economy. The organizations will collaborate with people based in Letcher County, Kentucky, which has one of the richest cultural heritages in the U.S., but is the poorest and sickest congressional district in the nation.

Multilingual artist Jen Shyu performs the musical Song of Silver Geese in six languages: English, Taiwanese, Tetum of East Timor, Korean, Javanese and Indonesian. If that’s not impressive enough, Jen plans on bringing the musical drama to all 50 states, focusing on small towns less exposed to cross-cultural and innovative art.

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It’s Gonna Be May: Summer Opportunities For Artists

2015 Artist-In-Residence David Shrove hosting his monthly studio visit. Photo" Michael Palma. Courtesy of the Sugar Hill Children's Museum of Art & Storytelling.

2015 Artist-In-Residence David Shrove hosting his monthly studio visit. Photo: Michael Palma. Courtesy of the Sugar Hill Children’s Museum of Art & Storytelling.

To quote our favorite teen boyband (and accompanying meme)—guess what: it’s gonna be May. If you’ve been waiting all spring to get yourself together and apply for that one residency (or grant, or open call)—now’s a pretty good time. If your a visual artists or a writer, this coming month is filled with exciting international opportunities to either work in isolated and inspiring spaces or incubate within an community. We’ve listed our favorite picks, all for free or with a stipend. Go forth!

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“The System Isn’t Broken. It’s Working Exactly As Intended”

We kicked off a series of artist discussions, called Creative Conversations, on April 19 that asks artists how they are dealing with important social issues. In the first part of our series we brought five Creative Capital artists together to discuss how they are using their practice to address criminal justice and mass incarceration. You can watch the full video above, or check out highlights from Twitter below on our Storify. Hope you enjoy!

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Your Blog Won a Grant: Now What? – Arts Blogging, Part 1

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Nate Larson and Marni Shindelman, “Geolocation.” From Kate Albers’ interview with the artists on her blog Circulation/Exchange

Blogs are by no means new, but the Creative Capital | Andy Warhol Foundation Arts Writers Grant category for blogging is still a unique award in its field. In some cases, it can be the only way arts writers can earn money for their personal blogs. In addition to issuing awards for articles, books, and short-form writing, the Arts Writers Grant Program supports bloggers writing on a range of art issues.

Since the Arts Writers Grant Program is now accepting applications through May 18, I wanted to get a sense of how bloggers specifically have used their award, so I reached out to a few past awardees. Their answers were so informative and important, that I will divide the interviews into a three part series.

The bloggers who contributed to this series are: Kate Albers who maintains Circulation/Exchange, featuring short critical essays exploring the intersection of social media and photography. Daniel Temkin’s esoteric.codes documents the history of obscure programming language and bridges the hacker and arts community. Founded in 2007, Sharon Butler’s Two Coats of Paint publishes commentary about painting, artist interviews and studio visits. And Gelare Khoshgozaran and Eungsong Kim’s contemptorary—which recently went live—is devoted to alternative and emerging artistic practices by women of color, queer and immigrant artists in the U.S.

Part I: So Your Blog Got a Grant—What Happens Now?

Writers who win grants for their blog don’t always just use the money to pay the rent and keep writing. Sometimes the money also helps them rethink their whole angle or go deeper into their subject.

Kate Albers: The grant allowed me to take two semesters of sabbatical (instead of one) from my faculty position at the University of Arizona. It really went entirely to this, straight income replacement. So while the money was spent on pretty mundane things—like rent, groceries, and child care—what it really funded was those extra months of time without teaching or university service responsibilities that I wouldn’t have had otherwise. The value of this is incalculable, and goes well beyond the parameters of what appears on Circulation/Exchange.

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Planting Seeds: Tracie Holder on Grantwriting

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Tracie Holder at the Scottish Documentary Institute

Tracie Holder learns how to tell her stories by first telling them to funders. As an award-winning filmmaker, fundraising consultant and engagement campaign specialist currently working with Women Make Movies, Tracie has raised an impressive $2 million for her projects from a mix of government funders, private foundations and individuals. On April 28th she’ll be leading her webinar, Grantwriting For Artists, covering all aspects of compelling and successful grantwriting for artists working in all disciplines. We talked to Tracie about how she got her chops in grantwriting and how artists can incorporate their search for funding into their creative practice.

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