Black Lives Matter.

This past week marked the anniversaries of the deaths of Eric Garner and Sandra Bland, along with the third anniversary of the inception of the Black Lives Matter movement. In the wake of the recent shootings of Alton Sterling and Philando Castile, along with other senseless acts of violence, these anniversaries are especially tragic. We at Creative Capital offer our support to artists, colleagues and staff who are struggling to process the continued systemic and largely unpunished violence against Black people in America. Creative Capital stands in solidarity with the Black Lives Matter movement and those who feel this brutality is unjust.

We are grateful for the artists all across America who are directly addressing our broken criminal justice system, systemic racism, sexism, homophobia, xenophobia and other forms of bigotry. Artists have the power to push our societal conversation forward–asking difficult questions, taking personal risks. We are proud to support their work, protect their freedom of expression and help amplify their voices. We have highlighted some relevant artist projects below, and members of our staff have contributed their own personal statements and resources as well. We invite artists and other members of our community to share more resources and responses on our Facebook page or below in the comments. We welcome feedback about what more we can do during this difficult time.

– Suzy and the staff at Creative Capital
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Grants & Residencies for Writers: Giving Your Work Some Space

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On Thursday, July 21st at 7:00 pm EST, Ethan Nosowsky will present his Creative Capital webinar, Applying for Grants & Residencies: Strategies for Writers.

I’ve been editing books for almost twenty years, and I can’t count the number of writers I’ve worked with who simply would not have gotten published without a well-timed grant or a much-needed residency at an artist’s colony. Being able to teach one less class, or having the time to clear your head and get down to work among other artists can provide the opportunity for a breakthrough that will allow you to finish a manuscript.

I’ve served as a judge on panels for many awards and residencies over the years, and I’ve often seen bad applications sink the chances of otherwise qualified writers. It’s important to realize that writing a strong application is a learned skill, and in my Creative Capital webinar, Applying for Grants & Residencies: Strategies for Writers, I try to explain what it is that prize committees and residency panels are looking for, and I offer tips that will help you put your best foot forward. Continue reading

Wrapping Up Blended Learning in New Jersey

On July 10th we celebrated the final convening of our New Jersey Blended Learning Program. Blended Learning is a multi-format course in financial and business management that helps artists establish a secure base upon which to create and grow their work. The four-month program combines a one-day Strategic Planning & Fundraising in-person workshop, three live webinars, a series of online courses, artist working groups and small group phone consultations.

This spring and summer, we presented Blended Learning to artists in two communities in New Jersey—Trenton and Newark. Artists from both communities gathered at Gallery Aferro in Newark for one last in-person workshop with our fantastic group of leaders: Colleen Keegan, Dread Scott, and Aaron Landsman.
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42 Choreographers Performing 1 Dance in “Exquisite Corps”

Mitchell Rose describes himself as a choreographer and performance artist turned filmmaker. His experience in both disciplines is easily seen in his recent work Exquisite Corps, which made the rounds on Facebook recently (or watch above). The video reads like a who’s who in American choreography with 42 choreographers dancing around the country as if together. It included tons of artists Creative Capital has supported over the past 17 years—including Meredith Monk, Faye Driscoll, Kyle Abraham and Ann Carlson—so we loved watching it. I touched base with Mitchell to find out more about the process of making the work and how dance can translate on social media.

Alex Teplitzky: Can you describe the process of making the video? How long did it take to make, and how did it all come together? Were there any difficulties in making it all come together?

Mitchell Rose: Exquisite Corps was a two-year process. It would have taken even longer, given how technical it is, but I had already done two years of R&D on a previous film, Globe Trot, which was applicable to this project. (You can see the Globe Trot manual here which will explain some of that.)

Each participant was told to watch the entire accumulated edit and then decide where they felt the trajectory of the choreography should go. They had to start by perfectly repeating the previous person’s final movement so there would be a motional continuity. They should dance for 2–10 seconds. (Most people did 10–15 seconds so I would have to find a suitable place to edit.) And they should do a number of takes to give me editing options. (Each participant was responsible for finding a helper to shoot it for them.)

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Make Art Anywhere: Upcoming Residency & Grant Opportunities

 

The Guadalupe Mountains National Park and... your future residency location?

The Guadalupe Mountains National Park and… your future residency location?

Whether you are an artist, performer, or writer, one of the perks of living creatively is that your work can flourish in many different contexts and many different cities. We’ve scoped some residencies and fellowships that will give your creative practice an international flair. Check out the upcoming deadlines and apply away!

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Pass It On: 6 Tips to Conduct a Great Studio Visit

Installation of exhibition, "If You Leave Me Can I Come Too?" at Hunter East Harlem Gallery, Fall 2015, Curated by Arden Sherman. Photo by Natalie Conn

Installation of exhibition, “If You Leave Me Can I Come Too?” at Hunter East Harlem Gallery, Fall 2015, Curated by Arden Sherman. Photo by Natalie Conn

Studio visits are a great way to get your work out into the world, and there can be a lot of pressure to make a great impression in a short window of time. But it’s not always obvious what makes a great studio visit; presenting your best work is only half the battle. For part two of our series, “Pass It On,” where we reach out to artists and curators to get advice to what makes a successful art career, we asked curator Arden Sherman about her experience with studio visits.

Arden is the Director and Curator of the Hunter East Harlem Gallery at Hunter College in New York. She also curates the blog Mise en green, which looks at exhibition photography that features potted plants in gallery spaces.

A studio visit is a great introduction to someone and their practice. However, this type of visit—a show and tell of sorts—can also be laborious, not to mention nerve-racking. For the artist, it’s a lot of pressure to present your work in the best light possible, all the while being smart, charming, and not too crazy, right? For the curator, gallerist, or collector, it’s about engagement, even if you’re totally exhausted and hungover from that uncomfortable awards dinner the night before, as a curator, you still have to be on-point and attentive. Here are my suggestions for artists to make the experience as smooth-sailing as possible.

1. Provide delicious snacks!

A GOOD SNACK GOES FAR! Pro Tip: You’re guaranteed a solo show if you have flavored seltzer on hand.

2. Objects over slides.

It’s always better to physically show us what your art looks like rather than a series of slides on your laptop. Videos are acceptable, but they shouldn’t be too long. Remember, personality and relationships (think, FUN!) typically sell the work as much as, if not more, than the work itself. (This is a keen interest of mine, so I discuss this a lot with colleagues. News alert: friendships actually work!).

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Hello from Suzy!

Creative Capital’s new Executive Director, Suzy Delvalle, at her desk

Queridos Amigos, hello from the Creative Capital office, where I’ve been settling in over the past few weeks, getting to know the fantastic staff, discussing priorities, and learning more about this incredible community of artists, consultants, partners, and supporters. As a long-time admirer of Creative Capital, I’m so honored to join this important organization and continue the legacy that Ruby has built over the past 17 years!

This leadership transition offers a great opportunity for Creative Capital to take stock of where we are, look at how the arts funding sector has changed, and build on the programs and resources we have developed to support individual artists. I plan to spend my first year here listening, learning, and working with our staff, board, and artist community to fully understand Creative Capital’s role and impact as we envision the next chapter in this organization’s important work. What an exciting challenge to take on!

In the meantime, you can expect Creative Capital’s ongoing work in support of ambitious artists nationwide to continue. This office is busier than ever!

I am so thrilled to be joining the Creative Capital family and working with all of you to ensure the bright future of this organization! Thank you for your support and engagement.

Apply for Fall Residencies with Upcoming Deadlines

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Summer is a great time to take a break from your art practice. But it’s also the time when you want to start applying for fall residencies. Artists never rest! To make your work a little easier, we’ve compiled a list of residencies that offer stipends or are free to attend. From a residency for culinary artists to one for community activists, there’s something for everyone!

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Build Your Crew: Developing Core Supporters for Your Work

Artist Dread Scott leading a Creative Capital workshops.

Artist Dread Scott leading a Creative Capital workshop.

The following post is adapted from artist Dread Scott’s upcoming webinar, Creating a Marketing Strategy, which covers all aspects of marketing your work, including defining your goals, developing effective communication tactics, and building your support community. Below are Dread’s tips for getting your crew of supporters together.

Like everything you do as an artist and a person, your marketing strategy should start with stating your goals. What are you trying to achieve with your efforts? The answers to this question could be “cultivate a funder,” “build an online community,” “sell more tickets,” or “announce a project.” While the objectives vary as much as the creative process, the key is to match your tactics with your goals.

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